Information & Referral

If you have come to our site seeking information, guidance, or referral services for yourself or another person, you have come to the right place. Wellspring is here to provide education and support to those who need assistance confronting the disease of alcoholism and drug dependence.

Information & Referral

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Treatment Referrals
Suffering from an addiction problem? We can help you find a treatment facility. You can either browse through our local Treatment Directory, allow us to make suggested referrals by using our self-administered Screening Tool, or if you prefer speaking with one of our professionals, call our confidential Referral Helpline. We are available Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. You can also contact us via email at mail@wellspringprevention.org. While not intended to diagnose a substance abuse problem, each of these options will help narrow your search for a program that best meets your needs. Note that the options provided do not represent an exhaustive list of all available programs or constitute an endorsement of particular programs. However, these are programs we have worked with and have consistently received positive feedback from those who have accessed their services. If you live outside of Middlesex County New Jersey, you can get help now by calling the New Jersey Addiction Services Hotline anytime at 844-276-2777. You can also access the New Jersey Mental Health Cares Information and Referral Helpline at 1-866-202-HELP (4357).
If you live outside of New Jersey, reach out to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence at www.ncadd.org or 212-269-7797 to find your nearest local resources.
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Jason Surks Memorial Resource Center
The Jason Surks Memorial Prevention Resource Center at Wellspring serves as a clearinghouse for free information about alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. Explore our vast collection of online information and helpful links, or visit us at our East Brunswick, NJ location to access free pamphlets, posters and DVD lending library.
More than just a physical and web-based library, our Resource Center is people. If you need assistance planning an educational program, need information for a health fair, or would like to contract with our staff to provide presentations in your community, please call us at 732-254-3344 or send us an email request at info@wellspringprevention.org.

Experts: Naloxone Alone Isn’t Enough to Address Opioid Addiction Crisis

image As more states expand access to the opioid overdose antidote naloxone, some experts say more is needed to address the opioid addiction crisis, USA Today reports.

Opioids include heroin as well as prescription drugs such as oxycodone.

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 30 states and the District of Columbia have implemented a law or developed a pilot program allowing naloxone to be administered by professional or lay persons. In some states, such as Ohio, people who administer naloxone must have specific training. Other states, such as Colorado, encourage education about overdoses and naloxone, but do not have training requirements.

Eric Fulcher, an emergency room physician at Sts. Mary & Elizabeth Hospital in Louisville, Kentucky, told the newspaper he generally supports wider access to naloxone. He is concerned, however, that new laws that expand naloxone access "totally ignore" the overall problem of addiction, and may signal an underlying acceptance of intravenous heroin use. "Politicians will feel like they've dealt with the problem," he said.

Karyn Hascal, president of The Healing Place, a Louisville recovery center, says while she supports easy access to naloxone for first responders, she worries providing the antidote to family and friends may give heroin users a false sense of security. They may think they can continue to use heroin, because loved ones will revive them with naloxone if they overdose, she said. "We've had a number of people here who have been revived several times by naloxone," which may indicate they saw it as a safety net, she noted.

Earlier this month, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Representative Elijah Cummings of Maryland called on the company that makes naloxone to lower the price of the drug nationwide. Last month, the company, Amphastar Pharmaceuticals, agreed to offer a $6 rebate per dose to agencies in New York state.