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JAN
24
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ATOD & Advocacy Recap - Week ending January 24, 2014

v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);} Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} The problem of symptoms and signs One of the first things you learn about in medical school is the difference between symptoms and signs. Symptoms stem from patients’ subjective experiences — how they’ve been feeling or what seems off to them. For example, “my stomach hurts,” “I feel tired,” or “my arm itches.” These complaints cannot be verified by lab tests or imaging. We simply have to rely on the patient’s word. On the other hand, there are signs. Fever. Rapid heart rate. Abnormal white blood cell counts. Doctors and nurses can objectively identify these characteristics, using everything from physical exams to high-tech gadgets. These findings independently clarify the patient’s...
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1727 Hits
JAN
17
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ATOD & Advocacy Update - Week Ending January 17, 2014

v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);} Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Study finds troubling relationship between drinking and PTSD symptoms in college students The estimated 9 percent of college students who have symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are likely to drink more alcohol than peers without the psychological condition. In turn, heavy alcohol consumption exacerbates their PTSD symptoms over time, prolonging a vicious cycle. Please click to continue reading. In Their Own Words: Melissa Batie Johnson: My version of health care reform I’m a drug dealer, in a very literal sense. I spend my days operating, with my father, a business that sells drugs, albeit legal ones, prescribed by local physicians to members of our community. The vast majority of...
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  1319 Hits
1319 Hits
JAN
10
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ATOD & Advocacy Update - Week Ending January 10, 2014

v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);} Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Alcohol brands defend sports sponsorships Alcohol makers including Diageo, Lion and Carlton and United Breweries have defended their involvement in sports sponsorship after calls for tighter restrictions on advertising within live broadcasts of sports matches. The Australian Greens have claimed alcohol brands who sponsor live sports are taking advantage of a “loophole” within regulations that allows them to advertise before the 8:30 pm watershed which means children and young people are exposed to the adverts. Richard Di Natale, acting leader of the party, claims alcohol brands linking to cricket and football is the “dark side” of Australian sport and claims it is fuelling a “dangerous and unhealthy” culture of drinking....
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1501 Hits
JAN
10
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ATOD & Advocacy Update - Week Ending January 10, 2014

v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);} Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Alcohol brands defend sports sponsorships Alcohol makers including Diageo, Lion and Carlton and United Breweries have defended their involvement in sports sponsorship after calls for tighter restrictions on advertising within live broadcasts of sports matches. The Australian Greens have claimed alcohol brands who sponsor live sports are taking advantage of a “loophole” within regulations that allows them to advertise before the 8:30 pm watershed which means children and young people are exposed to the adverts. Richard Di Natale, acting leader of the party, claims alcohol brands linking to cricket and football is the “dark side” of Australian sport and claims it is fuelling a “dangerous and unhealthy” culture of drinking....
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  1512 Hits
1512 Hits
JAN
06
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ATOD & Advocacy Update - Week Ending January 3, 2014

v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);} Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Two-Thirds of U.S. Residents Who First Started Using Drugs in the Past Year Began with Marijuana; 26% Started with Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs, Primarily Pain Relievers An estimated 2.9 million persons ages 12 or older used an illicit drug other than alcohol or a prescription drug nonmedically for the first time in the past year, according to data from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Two-thirds (66%) of these new users reported that marijuana was the first drug they tried. Slightly more than one-fourth (26%) reported that prescription drugs used nonmedically were the first drug they tried, including pain relievers (17%), tranquilizers (4%), stimulants (4%), and...
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  1349 Hits
1349 Hits
DEC
19
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ATOD & Advocacy Update - Week Ending December 20, 2013

v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);} Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} On behalf of your friends at NCADD Middlesex, warmest greetings of the season and best wishes for happiness in the New Year and Holiday Blessings! Heavy Marijuana Use in Teen Years Linked to Damaged Brain Structures: Study Heavy marijuana use in the teenage years could damage brain structures vital to memory and reasoning, a new study suggests. The study found changes in the sub-cortical regions of the brain, which are part of the memory and reasoning circuits, NBC News reports. Young people who had changes in this region of the brain performed more poorly on memory tests than their peers who did not use marijuana. The heavy marijuana users in...
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1383 Hits
DEC
13
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ATOD & Advocacy Update - Week Ending December 13, 2013

v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);} Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Mentally Ill People with Substance Use Disorders Not Most Likely to Use ER: Study A new study dispels the myth that the most frequent users of hospital emergency rooms are people with mental illness and substance use disorders. This population accounts for only a small percentage of visits, the researchers found. The study looked at emergency room visits made by more than 212,000 Medicaid patients in New York City since 2007, HealthDay reports. The researchers found patients who frequently use the ER tend to have multiple chronic health conditions and many hospitalizations. There is evidence for effective alcohol policy – why isn't it taken seriously? 100,000 years of working life...
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  1242 Hits
1242 Hits
DEC
06
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ATOD & Advocacy Update - Week Ending December 6, 2013

v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);} Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} 6.8 Million Adults Had Both Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorder in 2011 In 2011, 18.9 million adults in the United States had past year substance use disorder (SUD), and 41.4 million adults had mental illness in the past year; 6.8 million adults experienced both (Figure). Among adults with SUD, 36.1 percent also had a co-occurring mental illness, whereas, among adults without SUD, 16.2 percent had mental illness. Among adults with mental illness in the past year, 16.5 percent had SUD, compared with 6.3 percent of adults who did not have mental illness. Providers working with individuals with either SUD or mental illness may consider screening for co-occurring disorders and...
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  2054 Hits
2054 Hits
NOV
22
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ATOD & Advocacy Update - Week Ending November 22, 2013

v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);} Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Zohydro to be Manufactured by Same Company That Makes Addiction Medicine The newly approved pure hydrocodone product, Zohydro ER (extended release), will be made by the same company that manufactures Vivitrol, a drug used to treat patients addicted to opioids or alcohol, The New York Times reports. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Zohydro ER last month for patients with pain that requires daily, around-the-clock, long-term treatment that cannot be treated with other drugs. Drugs such as Vicodin contain a combination of hydrocodone and other painkillers such as acetaminophen. Zohydro is expected to reach the market in early 2014. In December 2012, a panel of experts assembled by the...
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  1521 Hits
1521 Hits
NOV
15
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ATOD & Advocacy Update - Week Ending November 15, 2013

v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);} Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Addiction Treatment Experts Await Details of Parity Rules Addiction and mental health treatment experts say they are hopeful new rules issued by the federal government that require parity between treatment for mental and physical illness will greatly expand access to care. They say a critical component of the rules’ success will be the criteria insurers use to include patients for addiction and mental health coverage. “This has been anxiously and long awaited,” Dr. Jeffrey Lieberman, President of the American Psychiatric Association, told NBC News. “Everything we’ve heard gives us a lot of encouragement. We just hope the rule goes far enough.” He said his organization will carefully review the new...
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  1262 Hits
1262 Hits

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