Our Blogs

JAN
31
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About Cool Down Book Bags

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Written by: Nicole Silva and Ashley Gasparro You’re right in the middle of a lesson and you have the students’ attention; you feel like they are actually understanding the concept! Students are raising their hands, contributing to the discussion ...when suddenly one of your students gets angry, frustrated, or just needs a break. It interrupts the flow of the class as you try to redirect that student and get him or her refocused. You lose momentum and the class loses attention. This is what commonly happens when students have not yet acquired the skills to help them gain control of their emotions. However, when given the right tools, students can start identifying exactly how they are feeling and begin to understand how to self regulate. The cool down book bag started out as the cool down center. It was an area of the room we designated for students to go to...
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123 Hits
JAN
27
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Prescription Drug Use among Teens on the Decline

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Written by Caroline Capriccio, Wellspring Intern Results published from the 2018 Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey found a decrease in prescription opioid use among teenagers over the past year. For instance, the MTF found that use of prescription narcotics among 12 th graders decreased from 4.2% in 2017 to 3.4% in 2018. Additionally, past year use of specific prescription narcotics such as OxyContin and Vicodin also decreased among 8 th , 10 th , and 12 th graders, compared with levels five years ago. According to the survey, misuse of some of the more popular prescription opioid medications is at historic lows among teens in school. Past-year misuse of the Rx opioid Vicodin dropped to just 1.7 %, and this reflects a long-term decline from a peak of 10.5% in 2003. The past year misuse of prescription/OTC drugs among 12 th graders in 2018 were: Sedatives/Tranquilizers: 5.0% Adderall®: 4.6% Opioids: 3.4%...
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84 Hits
JAN
27
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Underage Drinking: On the Decline?

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Written by Samantha Dolci, Wellspring Intern 2018 has set a new record low for underage drinking in the United States. According to the 2018 Monitoring the future survey (MTF), underage drinking among American youth continued to decline from previous years to the lowest levels recorded among 8 th , 10th, 12th graders since the 1990’s. Additionally, drinking among 12 th graders in 2018 reached the lowest level in survey history, with a significant decrease in lifetime, past month, daily consumption and binge drinking. Underage drinking statistics play an important role in encouraging governments and communities to step up their efforts for prevention and treatment. It is often used as a form of baseline data to determine the most highly affected demographics and areas in need. Approximately one out of every 10 alcoholic drinks in the U.S.A is consumed illegally. Though the legal drinking age in the United States is 21, children...
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76 Hits
JAN
16
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School Athletes and Opioids: A Risky Proposition

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By Elaine Chan, Intern The New Year can offer many, new, and exciting opportunities. However, the New Year can also pose arduous obstacles. One of the challenges that school administrators and communities may face is the opioid misuse prevalence among student–athletes as new sports season starts. Despite the positive benefits young athletes gain from participating in organized sports, such participation may actually put some adolescents at risk for substance use because of increased access to pain medications. Youths who participate in high-injury sports may be surrounded by peers who are more likely to have leftover prescription opioids, making it easier to receive diverted prescription opioids to ease injuries without having to acknowledge to parents and coaches that they need medical attention (e.g., hiding injuries from coaches to participate). Therefore, youths involved in organized sports may be at a higher risk to misuse opioid medications because of their increased risk for injury....
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86 Hits
JAN
01
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Have You Ever Stepped on a Nail?

Ask people if they’ve ever stepped on a nail and most will say yes. It can happen to anyone, although the odds go up when lots of boards with nails in them are lying around and people are not paying attention. No one wants or expects to step on a nail. It’s a no-fault wound. Addiction is more likely to develop when lots of addictive substances are within easy reach and people are not paying attention. Some people are more susceptible than others, but it can happen to anyone. No one wants or expects to develop addiction. It’s another no-fault wound. Concern and individualized assistance are appropriate responses to no-fault wounds. Blame and judgment are not. Our responses to people with addiction ought to be like our responses to people who step on a nail. We might begin by expressing concern for the injured person and then proceed to administer the...
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63 Hits
DEC
14
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Reducing Risk at Your Holiday Party

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Holiday parties offer a wonderful opportunity to connect with friends and celebrate community. Yet the ready availability of alcohol during holiday celebrations can be dangerous, contributing to sharp increases in alcohol-related traffic fatalities during the holiday season. If you choose to serve alcohol at your holiday party, here are some tips for keeping your guests safe. Stay safe and happy holidays! Always serve food. Drinking on an empty stomach leads to a more rapid absorption of alcohol into the bloodstream. High-protein foods such as cheese and meat can slow this absorption down. Avoid serving salty snacks. These tend to make people thirsty and so drink more than they might otherwise. Provide appealing non-alcoholic alternatives. You’ll be surprised to see how many guests choose an enticing, alcohol-free “mocktail” when they have the option. Also have plenty of jugs of water and/or bottles of seltzer available. Avoid serving alcoholic punch. Punch tend to...
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87 Hits
DEC
13
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On Opioid Addiction & Women

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During a recent event hosted by the American Association of University Women several experts spoke on how the opioid epidemic is impacting Erie County and particularly, women. Dr. Sarah Abdelsayed is a faculty member in the University at Buffalo Department of Family Medicine who is board-certified in family medicine and addiction medicine, and there is one thing she wants people to know: that addiction — whether it affects men or women — is not a character flaw. “It’s a disease, so it’s not a moral issue,” said Abdelsayed, whose list of accomplishments and specialities is lengthy, having completed engineering school, medical school and a family medicine residency at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, before coming to Buffalo for the UB Addiction Medicine Fellowship in 2015. According to Abdelsayed, the disease of addiction attacks the center of the brain associated with decision-making, and treatment for such a disease must be...
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90 Hits
NOV
28
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Don’t Overindulge This Holiday Season—Effects of Alcohol on the Body

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Mulled wine. Spiked egg nog. Hot toddies. Champagne toasts. The list of festive holiday drinks is endless. And so are your opportunities to overdo it. So before the festive season gets into full swing, take a moment to understand what all that alcohol does to your body. After your first alcoholic drink or two (which is moderate drinking, by the way), you start to get that relaxed, sociable feeling. Your heart rate speeds up; you feel animated and may have a happy buzz. But make no mistake; at this point your brain and nerves—which control reflexes and thinking—are already impaired. If you keep drinking, things start to go downhill quickly. Since your hands and feet may not be in sync with your brain and reflexes, your coordination and reaction time may be out of sorts. Lack of mental clarity can also lead to poor judgment and rash decisions. There’s also the...
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  144 Hits
144 Hits
NOV
09
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Don’t Let the Burden of Loss Drag Our Youth Down

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The past few weeks have been rough for the Wellspring family. One of our staff lost her 36 year old son and at Carteret High School, and more specifically our Pathways program at the school, lost one of their students. This got me thinking about the power of loss to transform us and those around us. Everyone experiences it differently, and though there is no “right” or “wrong” way to grieve, some ways of coping are more productive than others. The thing is, I don’t ever remember learning about how to handle loss until I lost my son 40 years ago. Which made me think about those we care for and educate every day. Our youth. When I look at these most important residents, I sometimes see a lot of pain, and I don’t think they know what to do with it. I worry they don’t have the time to even...
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157 Hits
NOV
01
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Opioid crisis: UB researcher hopes to provide clues on women’s shift to heroin

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A growing number of women in the U.S. are turning to heroin after first taking prescription opioid medication. This places them at greater risk for HIV and hepatitis C, and for spending time in the court system. Scientists, however, have little insight into why this is happening. A University at Buffalo researcher, with colleagues from Columbia University and the University of Rochester, has received funding to provide some clues by working with a unique drug treatment court (DTC) in Buffalo. Sarahmona Przybyla, PhD, an assistant professor of community health and health behavior in UB’s School of Public Health and Health Professions, was awarded $30,000 through the University of Rochester Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) for the 10-month project. Przybyla’s co-principal investigator is Diane Morse, MD, an infectious disease physician at the University of Rochester. The script was flipped between the 1960s and early 2000s, according to federal data from the National...
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  162 Hits
162 Hits

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