Information & Referral

If you have come to our site seeking information, guidance, or referral services for yourself or another person, you have come to the right place. Wellspring is here to provide education and support to those who need assistance confronting the disease of alcoholism and drug dependence.

Information & Referral

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Treatment Referrals
Suffering from an addiction problem? We can help you find a treatment facility. You can either browse through our local Treatment Directory, allow us to make suggested referrals by using our self-administered Screening Tool, or if you prefer speaking with one of our professionals, call our confidential Referral Helpline. We are available Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. You can also contact us via email at mail@wellspringprevention.org. While not intended to diagnose a substance abuse problem, each of these options will help narrow your search for a program that best meets your needs. Note that the options provided do not represent an exhaustive list of all available programs or constitute an endorsement of particular programs. However, these are programs we have worked with and have consistently received positive feedback from those who have accessed their services. If you live outside of Middlesex County New Jersey, you can get help now by calling the New Jersey Addiction Services Hotline anytime at 844-276-2777. You can also access the New Jersey Mental Health Cares Information and Referral Helpline at 1-866-202-HELP (4357).
If you live outside of New Jersey, reach out to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence at www.ncadd.org or 212-269-7797 to find your nearest local resources.
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Jason Surks Memorial Resource Center
The Jason Surks Memorial Prevention Resource Center at Wellspring serves as a clearinghouse for free information about alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. Explore our vast collection of online information and helpful links, or visit us at our East Brunswick, NJ location to access free pamphlets, posters and DVD lending library.
More than just a physical and web-based library, our Resource Center is people. If you need assistance planning an educational program, need information for a health fair, or would like to contract with our staff to provide presentations in your community, please call us at 732-254-3344 or send us an email request at info@wellspringprevention.org.

Big Increase in Marijuana Potency Since 1980s, Colorado Lab Finds

image Marijuana being grown today is much more potent than marijuana grown 20 or 30 years ago, according to a study by a Colorado-based lab.

"I would say the average potency of marijuana has probably increased by a factor of at least three. We're looking at average potencies right now of around 20 percent THC," said Charas Scientific lab founder Andy LaFrate, PhD. He presented his findings this week at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society.

THC is the psychoactive compound in marijuana that produces the feeling of being high.

"As far as potency goes, it's been surprising how strong a lot of the marijuana is," said LaFrate. "We've seen potency values close to 30 percent THC, which is huge."

Federal officials say THC levels in marijuana averaged 4 percent in the 1980s, CBS News reports.

Current THC levels found by Charas exceed those reported by federal officials. In 2012, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) said marijuana confiscated by polices agencies nationwide had THC levels that averaged about 15 percent.

NIDA notes that increases in potency may account for the rise in emergency department visits involving marijuana use. "For frequent users, it may mean a greater risk for addiction if they are exposing themselves to high doses on a regular basis. However, the full range of consequences associated with marijuana's higher potency is not well understood," NIDA notes on its website.

Many samples tested by Charas had little or no cannabidiol, a compound in marijuana many researchers believe has potential medical uses, the article notes.

The lab also found contaminants in many marijuana samples, such as fungus, bacteria or traces of heavy metals. Contamination testing is required in Washington state, but not in Colorado. Both states have legalized the recreational use of marijuana.

To learn more about Marijuana, please click here.

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