Information & Referral

If you have come to our site seeking information, guidance, or referral services for yourself or another person, you have come to the right place. Wellspring is here to provide education and support to those who need assistance confronting the disease of alcoholism and drug dependence.

Information & Referral

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Treatment Referrals
Suffering from an addiction problem? We can help you find a treatment facility. You can either browse through our local Treatment Directory, allow us to make suggested referrals by using our self-administered Screening Tool, or if you prefer speaking with one of our professionals, call our confidential Referral Helpline. We are available Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. You can also contact us via email at mail@wellspringprevention.org. While not intended to diagnose a substance abuse problem, each of these options will help narrow your search for a program that best meets your needs. Note that the options provided do not represent an exhaustive list of all available programs or constitute an endorsement of particular programs. However, these are programs we have worked with and have consistently received positive feedback from those who have accessed their services. If you live outside of Middlesex County New Jersey, you can get help now by calling the New Jersey Addiction Services Hotline anytime at 844-276-2777. You can also access the New Jersey Mental Health Cares Information and Referral Helpline at 1-866-202-HELP (4357).
If you live outside of New Jersey, reach out to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence at www.ncadd.org or 212-269-7797 to find your nearest local resources.
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Jason Surks Memorial Resource Center
The Jason Surks Memorial Prevention Resource Center at Wellspring serves as a clearinghouse for free information about alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. Explore our vast collection of online information and helpful links, or visit us at our East Brunswick, NJ location to access free pamphlets, posters and DVD lending library.
More than just a physical and web-based library, our Resource Center is people. If you need assistance planning an educational program, need information for a health fair, or would like to contract with our staff to provide presentations in your community, please call us at 732-254-3344 or send us an email request at info@wellspringprevention.org.

Blackouts Common Among Teens Who Drink

image Among teens who drink, 90 percent have blacked out after drinking at least once by the time they reached age 19, according to a new study of British adolescents.

Teens who black out after drinking are more likely to be female.

When a person blacks out, they appear to be awake, alert and intoxicated, but they have no memory of what has happened. At high enough doses, alcohol impairs the acquisition of memory.

Females are more likely to black out because they weigh less and have less body water to dilute the alcohol, the researchers noted.

The study included 1,402 teens ages 15 to 19 who drank. Other risk factors for blacking out after drinking included smoking, having sensation-seeking and impulsive behaviors, lacking conscientiousness and having friends who also drank or used other substances, Time reports.

The findings appear in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

"It's not as if a blackout in these kids was an isolated phenomenon," said lead researcher Marc Schuckit, professor of psychiatry at the University of California San Diego. "Blackouts are unfortunately often considered to be a funny thing as opposed to dangerous. I am not sure the average person realizes the dangers associated with blackouts."

In a press release, he noted, "Someone who has had a blackout cannot remember part of their drinking episode. As you can imagine, blackouts are likely to occur when the drinker is vulnerable to a range of additional dangerous consequences. Women might have unprotected sex, place themselves in a situation where they can be raped, or not be fully capable of protecting themselves.

Men can get into fights, use very bad judgment regarding another person, and are often the driver when BACs (blood alcohol concentrations) associated with blackouts can lead to a car accident. Blackouts are very dangerous for both men and women."

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