Information & Referral

If you have come to our site seeking information, guidance, or referral services for yourself or another person, you have come to the right place. Wellspring is here to provide education and support to those who need assistance confronting the disease of alcoholism and drug dependence.

Information & Referral

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Treatment Referrals
Suffering from an addiction problem? We can help you find a treatment facility. You can either browse through our local Treatment Directory, allow us to make suggested referrals by using our self-administered Screening Tool, or if you prefer speaking with one of our professionals, call our confidential Referral Helpline. We are available Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. You can also contact us via email at mail@wellspringprevention.org. While not intended to diagnose a substance abuse problem, each of these options will help narrow your search for a program that best meets your needs. Note that the options provided do not represent an exhaustive list of all available programs or constitute an endorsement of particular programs. However, these are programs we have worked with and have consistently received positive feedback from those who have accessed their services. If you live outside of Middlesex County New Jersey, you can get help now by calling the New Jersey Addiction Services Hotline anytime at 844-276-2777. You can also access the New Jersey Mental Health Cares Information and Referral Helpline at 1-866-202-HELP (4357).
If you live outside of New Jersey, reach out to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence at www.ncadd.org or 212-269-7797 to find your nearest local resources.
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Jason Surks Memorial Resource Center
The Jason Surks Memorial Prevention Resource Center at Wellspring serves as a clearinghouse for free information about alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. Explore our vast collection of online information and helpful links, or visit us at our East Brunswick, NJ location to access free pamphlets, posters and DVD lending library.
More than just a physical and web-based library, our Resource Center is people. If you need assistance planning an educational program, need information for a health fair, or would like to contract with our staff to provide presentations in your community, please call us at 732-254-3344 or send us an email request at info@wellspringprevention.org.

Can Cannabis Be Made Safer?

Can Cannabis Be Made Safer?As cannabis laws become liberalised in many countries, experts writing in The Lancet Psychiatry argue that there is an urgent need to explore how cannabis use can be made safer.The authors say that policy makers and researchers should consider regulating cannabis potency, reducing the use of tobacco (e.g. by using vapourisers), and exploring how the chemical composition of cannabis could be modified to reduce harm without altering the pleasurable effects of the drug.In the past 40 years, the potency of cannabis has on average doubled worldwide and there is evidence of a greater number of people seeking help for cannabis use disorders in the UK, Europe, and USA.Despite prohibitive laws on possession and use of cannabis being introduced in the 1960s, cannabis use has increased in most parts of the world, suggesting the laws have had little effect on use and abuse. Uruguay and a number of US states, including California, Oregon, Alaska, Maine, Massachusetts, Washington, Nevada, and Colorado allow cannabis to be sold for recreational purposes. Canada is set to legalise its recreational use in 2017 and several European countries, including Portugal, Spain and the Netherlands, have lessened or abolished sanctions on possession and use.The main active compounds found in cannabis are delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). High potency cannabis is high in THC with low (or absent) levels of CBD. This variety is commonly known as sinsemilla (Spanish meaning "without seed") or sometimes "skunk". Recent evidence suggests that CBD may protect against some of the detrimental effects of THC such as memory impairment and paranoia.Dr Tom Freeman, a co-author and Senior Research Fellow for the Society for the Study of Addiction said: "In the last eight years, the number of people in the UK entering specialist treatment for cannabis increased by over 50%. During the same time period, street cannabis has become increasingly strong with high levels of THC and little or no CBD. Further research on CBD is now needed - both to investigate its potential role in mitigating the harmful effects of THC in cannabis, but also as a potential treatment for the minority of people who develop problematic cannabis use. Efforts to reduce the common practice of mixing cannabis with tobacco could potentially prevent people progressing to nicotine dependence, providing a substantial benefit for public health."Source article: Can we make cannabis safer? Amir Englund, Tom P Freeman, Robin M Murray, Philip McGuire, The Lancet Psychiatry, doi: 10.1016/S2215-0366(17)30075-5, published 1 March 2017.

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